UK Airport To Permanently Close, Most Flights Cancelled – A Sign of Things To Come?

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Back in 2020, experts warned that airports, especially the smaller ones, could be permanently closed following the covid pandemic.

Climate change has also managed to come into play.

Just this month an airport in the UK has confirmed that it is to close permanently, seeing all flights cancelled.

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Not only will this mean over 3,000 jobs are at risk, but thousands of flights a year will be affected.

According to the Sun newspaper, Doncaster Sheffield Airport has confirmed that flights will start “winding down” from October 31, will an official closing date yet to be confirmed.

Peel Group, which owns the airport, said that it was no longer viable to operate due to a “lack of adequate forward revenues and high operating costs”.

And Wizz Air, which was one of the largest operators, also pulled out, leaving just TUI flights.

Aviation analytics firm Cirium said it was the 26th biggest airport in the UK, recording 4,609 flights in 2019.

Could this be part of the push to make ‘air travel history?

One Nation reports: Within 5 to 7 years, ordinary people will no longer have the right to fly in the way that they were used to pre-2020. Within 10 years, they won’t have the right to fly at all.

The plan is to make air travel the exclusive domain of the super wealthy only. Throughout 2022, we have seen airlines cancelling flights and routes by the bucketload. In the US, 34,000 flights scheduled for November were removed – a reduction of 40 percent. To date, British Airways has cut 30,000 flights from its original flight schedule for 2022, a reduction of 18 percent. And yet no-one’s really questioning any of it.

There are all sorts of references to “staff shortages” and “fuel costs” but these are just pre-texts. What nobody is prepared to say is that all these cuts are being made in accordance with specific target-driven quotas from the UN, which the airlines all agreed to in 2019.

The goal is to gradually restrict people’s ability to fly, before eliminating the sector altogether. The ‘step-change’ approach is just to condition you into accepting it. Take a look at the 2019 UKFires document, ABSOLUTE ZERO. On page 2 it states:

“There are no options for zero-emissions flight in the time available for action, so the industry faces a rapid contraction. DEVELOPMENTS IN ELECTRIC FLIGHT MAY BE RELEVANT BEYOND 2050.”
Page 5 sets out the timeline for 2020-2029 with “all airports except Heathrow, Glasgow and Belfast to close”. From 2030 to 2049: “ALL REMAINING AIRPORTS CLOSE”.

The signs of what is happening are everywhere. France has banned internal domestic flights that are less than 2 hours. If there’s a train available, you must now take it. You can’t just jump on a ‘short haul’ flight in France anymore. No-one ever asked the French people if they wanted such a ban, it was just imposed on them anyway.

In Norway, politicians are considering individual flight quotas, restricting how many flights you can take yearly and where. They also want a ban on duty free shopping and internal domestic flights like France.
In the Netherlands, Schiphol, 70 percent owned by the Dutch Government, announced the world’s first flight cap at Amsterdam Airport, the world’s third largest aviation hub. Passenger taxes are to be tripled and airport charges increased 37 percent.

Of course climate change also manages to come into play