Teacher Who Spoke Out About Illegal Immigration Targeted For Firing

A Texas school teacher has been targeted for firing after tweeting President Trump stating her school has been "taken over" by illegal aliens.

An English teacher who reached out to President Trump on Twitter, informing him that her Texas school has been “taken over” by illegal aliens, has been recommended for termination by her school board over her use of “racially insensitive” language.

“Mr. President, Fort Worth Independent School District is loaded with illegal students from Mexico,” read one of the posts linked to Georgia Clark’s Twitter account. “Carter-Riverside High School has been taken over by them.”

Star-Telegram reports: The board voted 8-0 in favor of a “proposed termination” of Georgia Clark, who was placed on administrative leave last week while the district investigated reports that she used racially insensitive language against students at Carter-Riverside High School on social media.

Now, it is up to Clark to decide if she wants to seek an appeal with the state. She has 15 days.

“Once the tweets came to light, so, too, did other allegations, and it was my professional judgment that it was in the best interest of the district,” said Superintendent Kent P. Scribner after the vote.

The board determined that Clark’s conduct and the public reaction to her conduct compromised her ability to teach.

The issue has drawn national attention as supporters of Clark argue she has a right to free speech.

Clark’s posts drew some support on social media by people who argued against illegal immigration. The group Fort Worth Republican Women urged people to speak up against firing the teacher and to send emails to school board trustees. 

“The only item on the agenda?” wrote the club on Facebook. “Firing the teacher who spoke out against illegal immigration.”

The board was required to vote on the issue because Clark is a contract employee who has protections under Texas laws. The termination moved Clark’s case into an appeal phase with the Texas Education Agency. Under that process, Clark can request a due process hearing. 

The education commissioner could then appoint a hearing officer who would listen to both sides of the issue. Generally, the hearing takes place within 60 days. 

The Fort Worth school board would have to vote again on the matter based on the recommendation of the hearing officer.

Clark remains employed by the district with pay during that process, according to the district. 

“This board has a strong record of supporting students and their quest for success, college, career and community leadership,” Scribner said. “Fort Worth serves 86,000 students, and it is our goal that we treat each one with dignity and respect, and based on the information that we have, we think this is the most responsible recommendation at this time.”

Baxter Dmitry

Baxter Dmitry

Baxter Dmitry is a writer at Your News Wire. He covers politics, business and entertainment. Speaking truth to power since he learned to talk, Baxter has travelled in over 80 countries and won arguments in every single one. Live without fear.
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Baxter Dmitry