Property Developers Cover Trees With Nets To Stop Birds Nesting In Them

UK property developers have caused outrage after covering trees in massive nets to keep out birds and get around rules preventing the cutting down of nesting grounds

Furious residents and conservationists took to Twitter to complain after the developers netted trees to keep the birds away during the peak nesting season.

A council leader called the move “unacceptable” and author Philip Pullman branded the netting as as “ugly, wicked and destructive”.

The Mail Online reports: The Walnut Tree Park housing development, being built by Sladen Estates, have covered numerous trees in Guildford, Surrey, with nets to stop birds nesting in them.

The move is thought to be because, under the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981, it is unlawful for them to cut down trees containing nesting birds.

But locals have branded the action ‘sickening’ and claim it is causing birds to die.

‘It is not just birds that cannot get to the trees, think of the insects trapped without thought or care too, it’s sickening, our culture has evolved to be quite vile,’ tweeted Rebecca Clifford.

TrinityPamela added: ‘If I saw this I’d be up there with a ladder and a pair of scissors, it’s the most offensive thing I’ve seen in a long time.

Home Farm Magpie said: ‘A very cynical ploy to get around the legislation. I have wondered for many years why no one has taken developers to task for operations that farmers are not allowed to do.

Michael Powell wrote: ‘Disgraceful behaviour and equally as bad as the illegal destruction of nests. Should be banned.’

Sarah Spencer-Adams tweeted: ‘Totally insane and cruel. Total disregard for the biosphere obviously.”

A spokesman for the RSPB said today: ‘This is just another example of us trying to squeeze nature into smaller and smaller spaces.

‘We would ask that developers do this tree and hedge removal work outside the breeding season so that netting is never needed.

‘However it is legal, so if absolutely necessary, it’s crucial that it be done properly. This means checking for birds when the netting is fitted, and then ongoing regular checks, as birds often find a way to get under the edge of a net and then get stuck.’