Pentagon’s Footage On Yemen Raid Was Ten Years Old!

Pentagon's Footage On Yemen Raid Was Ten Years Old!

The Pentagon has been caught attempting to pass off an old propaganda video to justify a deadly raid in Yemen.

The Pentagon promptly withdrew an old video it had released to use as ‘evidence’ that a fatal raid in Yemen this week was a counter-terrorism success.

The US military removed the video from their website after it was exposed to be vintage Al-Qaeda footage that was made public a decade ago.

On Friday, the Pentagon posted a video to the Defense Video Imagery Distribution System (DVIDS) website which they said justified the operation in Yemen which cost the life of one US Navy SEAL along with several Yemeni civilians.

The video which purported to show “important intelligence”was taken down after officials realized the footage has been available online for ten years.

The footage entitled, “Lessons in How to Destroy the Cross,” were first posted to the Site Intelligence group website in 2007.

Several hours after its posting, the material was removed from the DVIDS site.

Press TV reports:

On Friday, the US military released footage that showed a ski-masked man encouraging people to build bombs, with a US Central Command spokesman touting it as an “example of the volumes of sensitive al-Qaeda terror-planning information recovered during the operation.”

However, the clip was abruptly taken down after experts in terrorist media said it was among a number of videos that were released online some 10 years ago.

“The video clip that was posted and abruptly taken down was one of 25 videos that appeared (published) in 2007,” said Adam Raisman, a senior analyst at SITE group which tracks online activities by extremist groups.

US military officials tried to downplay the blunder by hyping up the Sunday raid in Yemen’s al-Bayda province. The operation was the first offensive authorized by Trump as the new commander in chief.

“It does not matter when the video was made, that they had it is still illustrative of who they are and what their intentions are,” Pentagon spokesman Captain Jeff Davis said.

CENTCOM spokesman Colonel John Thomas confirmed that the footage was old.

“We didn’t want it to appear that we were trying to pass off an old video as a new video,” he said.

The January 29 mission killed 14 militants. Washington said a Navy SEAL also lost his life during the attack and three others were injured.

Medics at the scene of the raid said that at least 30 people, including 10 women and children, also died as a result.

At least three US officials confirmed to Reuters earlier this week that the operation was carried out without sufficient intelligence, ground support or adequate backup.