Over 100 ‘Woke’ Pro-Biden Corporations Collude to Overturn Election Security Measures

100 woke pro-Biden corporations meet to plot overturning election security measures

Over 100 ‘woke’ pro-Biden corporations have met to plot their opposition to new laws designed to protect election security and voter integrity, according to reports.

The leaders of dozens of left-wing corporations met over the weekend at a major event seeking to overturn voter integrity laws across the United States.

The move comes in response to a campaign of false statements issued by Democrat politicians, including President Biden himself.

Executives from companies such as American Airlines, United Airlines, Levi Strauss & Co., Walmart, ViacomCBS, Ariel Investments, LinkedIn, Twitter, and AMC Theaters were all invited to the zoom meeting on Saturday, organized by Yale School of Management professor Jeffrey Sonnenfeld in conjunction with the Coalition for Inclusive Capitalism and the Leadership Now Project.

Nypost.com reports: Sonnenfeld said after the meeting that the groups initially invited over 100 CEOs. “We were praying for 25 and we got 90,” he said, adding that they also managed to convince an additional 30 experts and historians to join the call.

While the groups declined to provide names of Saturday’s attendees, Merck & Co. CEO Kenneth Frazier and American Express CEO Kenneth Chenault were both reported to have spoken at the virtual gathering.

Frazier, who helped gather 71 other prominent black business leaders to sign a letter late last month condemning efforts to tighten voting rules, urged fellow CEOs to make similar calls.

Chenault reportedly did the same.

In a statement following the meeting, the group said, “CEOs indicated readiness to act individually and collectively to shore up American democracy and ensure Americans have access to a world-class voting system.”

“CEOs who participated in a live poll indicated they will re-evaluate donations to candidates supporting bills that restrict voting rights and many would reconsider investments in states which act upon such proposals.”

Other prominent names who reportedly logged on include WalMart CEO Doug McMillon, billionaire Atlanta Falcons owner Arthur Blank, Ariel Investments co-CEO Mellody Hobson, Levi Strauss Chairman Chip Bergh, LinkedIn CEO Reid Hoffman, American Airlines CEO Doug Parker, Delta Airlines CEO Ed Bastian, United Airlines CEO Scott Kirby and General Motors CEO Mary Barra.

Former 21st Century Fox CEO James Murdoch and wife Kathryn Hufschmid Murdoch also attended.

Fox shares a common owner with News Corp., the publisher of The Post.

The meeting comes amid debate over Major League Baseball’s decision to pull its All-Star Game from Georgia in protest of the state’s new voter law.

The legislation in question, signed by Gov. Brian Kemp late last month, overhauls election protocols in Georgia, placing new restrictions on voting by mail, requiring voter ID, and increasing legislative control over the voting process.

President Biden initially referred to the bill as “Jim Crow on steroids” the day after its signing, but went even further within days, saying he would “strongly support” moving the MLB’s mid-summer classic in protest.

But Biden was awarded “Four Pinocchios” by the Washington Post, which endorsed his candidacy, for spreading misinformation about the state law’s impact on voting hours.

The law does not alter Election Day hours but expands early voting by adding a second mandatory Saturday. It also affirms that counties have the option of opening two Sundays and allows counties to extend early voting hours beyond standard business hours.

Within two days of the corporate and Democratic pressure campaign endorsed by the president, the MLB said it was pulling its mid-summer classic out of Atlanta to protest the law.

That move sparked backlash, given that the league opted to move its game from a city with a large population of minorities who would benefit from the business. It moved it to Denver, Colo., with a significantly lower minority population and even tighter voting laws than Georgia’s.