Government Scientists Say No Singing, Dancing Or Playing Board Games Over Christmas

Christmas

Government scientists have advised families in the UK to steer clear of singing, dancing or even palying board games when they meet up this Christmas.

They have even urged Britons to avoid spending too long eating their christmas dinner and of course they should definitley NOT hug Grandma.

The Mail Online reports: People should consider using place names to avoid contamination at the dinner table – and be on their guard when it comes to the washing up, says the scientific advisory committee Sage.

And they should consider self-isolating for two weeks both before and after the five-day ‘Christmas bubble’ break to minimise the risk of spreading the virus.

In a raft of documents yesterday, the scientists warned that any relaxation of restrictions over the festive period could result in a ‘large rise’ in transmission rates which could ultimately see prevalence of the virus ‘easily double’.

The advice was revealed yesterday in documents that were discussed at meetings held between October 29 and earlier this week.

One document, titled Key Evidence and Advice on Celebrations and Observances during Covid-19, said: ‘Avoid repeated and extended overnight stays.

‘If possible and circumstances allow, self-quarantine for two weeks before and after visit.’ It added that maintaining existing ‘bubbles’ rather than creating new ones could also help.

Separate documents, meanwhile, suggested families should implement a series of rules around the home – including who does the washing up. Scientists said those meeting up would ‘let their guard down with those they are closest to’.

The elaborate guidance, which is from recommendations by Sage sub-committees but has not been formally adopted, suggested people should use place names to position themselves safely at the dinner table and reduce the use of shared serving spoons.

It said that meals should be kept as short as possible and that whoever is clearing up should be vigilant when putting dishes in the dishwasher.

Hugs, kisses and handshakes are best avoided, with gestures such as ‘elbow bumps or air greetings’ used instead.

It suggested families should be told to avoid board games in which objects are shared, advising non-contact entertainment such as quizzes.