Facebook To Give Data On ‘Hate Speech’ Suspects To French Courts

Facebook has agreed to hand over identifying information to French courts on people suspected of using hate speech on its platform, according to France’s minister for digital affairs

The deal follows meetings between Facebook’s founder Mark Zuckerberg and French President Emmanuel Macron and is said to be a world first.

RT reports: France’s minister for digital affairs and former top advisor to President Emmanuel Macron, Cedric O, confirmed the agreement on Tuesday, but suggested the courtesy would not be extended to other nations.

This is huge news, it means that the judicial process will be able to run normally,” O told Reuters. “It’s really very important, they’re only doing it for France.”

The deal between the world’s largest social media network and France came after a series of meetings between Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg and Macron. 

The social network had already been giving French authorities IP addresses and identifying data of suspected terrorists after judges demanded their cooperation, but this is the first time the agreement has extended to hate speech.

Macron has made no secret of his interest in regulating online hate speech and fake news. Recently, parliament has been considering implementing a fine of 4 percent of a tech company’s global revenue if they are found to not have done enough to remove certain content from their network.