China Creates ‘Hotline’ To Report Citizens Who ‘Criticize’ The state Or ‘Misinterpret’ History

China Xi Jinping

A new system has been created for citizens to report to the government anyone who “denies the excellence of the Chinese advanced socialist culture”.

Reminiscent of George Orwell’s dystopian novel 1984 , in this new mechanism of state surveillance and control, normal Chinese citizens can also inform the government of anyone who is “spreading an ‘incorrect’ interpretation of history”.

The Express reports: A retired US diplomat David Cowhig has translated a recent Chinese Communist Party initiative to encourage citizens to use a “report zone for harmful information involving historical nihilism”.

China-based journalist Michael Standaert today tweeted that “a new hotline has been launched for those interested in reporting their friends, neighbours, and colleagues for making ‘incorrect remarks about history’.”

The news was also reported by BBC China correspondent Stephen McDonell, whom today tweeted: “A new service enabling people in China to report others for spreading an ‘incorrect’ interpretation of history.”

The BBC journalist added: “Who to report?

“Well those who ‘distort the history of the Chinese Communist Party’ or ‘the history of socialist development’.”

In addition to this, the BBC journalist stated that Chinese citizens can also report “those who have defamed the Communist Party’s ‘heroes and martyrs”.

Mr McDonell quotes from a source released by the “Reporting Center of the Cyberspace Administration of China”.

Another offence that should be reported was anyone who attacked the Chinese Communist Party’s “guiding ideology”.

In 2018 President Xi Jinping of China announced the abolition of presidential term limits, creating the situation where he could hold power until death.

When President Xi made the amendment, BBC reporter Mr McDonell wrote: “It is now hard to see Xi Jinping being challenged in any way whatsoever.

“He has amassed power the likes of which has not been seen since Chairman Mao Zedong.

“Only five years ago Beijing was being ruled by a collective leadership.

“Under ex-President Hu Jintao you could imagine differing views being expressed in the then nine-member Politburo Standing Committee.

“Now all this is gone.”

After the amendment was created, the Chinese politburo suddenly decided to censor social-media references to George Orwell’s Animal Farm and 1984.

This move was to pre-empt Chinese citizens who might connect Beijing’s latest authoritarian methods with those imagined by Mr Orwell in his famous novels.

According to a report in The Atlantic, not long after Xi Jinping inaugurated himself as leader for life, Chinese citizens found that they could not type 19, 80, and four in sequence on social media sites within the country.