Calls To Reinforce Capitol Security After Car Attack Left Officer Dead

capitol fencing

Yesterdays deadly breach of the Capitols perimeter may delay the reopening of the building’s grounds to the public

Capitol Police officer William Billy Evans, was killed on Friday when a man rammed his car into a barrier outside the Senate side of the building.

This happened just as lawmakers were eyeing a return to more normal security measures following the capitol riot on Jan. 6. Democrats are now saying the breach should delay any decision about when the fencing will come down

Mail Online reports: The driver, identified as 25-year-old Noah Green, was shot and killed after he got out of his car and lunged at police with a knife.

The deaths came less than two weeks after the Capitol Police removed an outer fence that had temporarily cut off a wide swath of the area to cars and pedestrians, blocking major traffic arteries that cross the city. 

The fencing had been erected to secure the Capitol after the violent mob of of then-President Donald Trump’s supporters attacked the building Jan. 6., interrupting the certification of President Joe Biden’s victory. The violence lead to the deaths of five people, including a Capitol Police officer.

Police, who took the brunt of the assaults that day, have left intact a second ring of fencing around the inner perimeter of the Capitol as they struggle to figure out how to best protect the building and those who work inside it. That tall, dark fencing – parts of it covered in razor wire until just recently — is still a stark symbol of the fear many in the Capitol felt after the mob laid siege two months ago.

Lawmakers have almost universally loathed the fencing, saying the seat of American democracy was meant to be open to the people, even if there was always going to be a threat.

But after Friday’s attack, some said they needed to proceed with caution.

‘It’s an eyesore, it sucks,’ Democratic Rep. Tim Ryan of Ohio said about the fencing in the hours after the two deaths. ‘Nobody wants that there. But the question is, is the environment safe enough to be able to take it down? In the meantime, maybe that fence can prevent some of these things from happening.’

Ryan, chairman of a House spending committee that oversees security and the Capitol, stressed that no decisions had been made, and that lawmakers would be ‘reviewing everything’ after the latest deadly incident. His committee and others are looking at not only the fence but at the staffing, structure, and intelligence capabilities of the Capitol Police.

‘The scab got ripped off again here today,’ Ryan said. ‘So we’ve got to figure this out.’

Despite the fencing, Friday’s breach happened inside the perimeter. The driver slipped through a gate that had opened to allow traffic in and out of the Capitol and rammed a barrier that had protected the building long before Jan. 6. And there was no evidence that Green’s actions were in any way related to the insurrection.