Ashton Kutcher: Chinese Communist Party Using TikTok to ‘Brainwash American Children’

Ashton Kutcher warns Chinese government are brainwashing American children via TikTok

Actor Ashton Kutcher has warned that the Chinese Communist Party is using TikTok to brainwash and push “anti-U.S. propaganda” onto American children.

In a recent interview with Joe Lonsdale of the American Optimist YouTube channel, Kutcher warned that China is using TikTok to influence young Americans and turn them against their own country.

“If I’m China, and I want to create a problem in that area of the world — specifically a naval problem in the South China Sea — I would probably want to utilize TikTok in order to influence the minds of Americans,” Kutcher admitted.

Theblaze.com reports: In early June, TikTok quietly updated its privacy policy with regard to United States users, allowing itself to collect U.S. users’ biometric data to include voice prints and face prints.

“We may collect information about the images and audio that are a part of your User Content, such as identifying the objects and scenery that appear, the existence and location within an image of face and body features and attributes, the nature of the audio, and the text of the words spoken in your User Content,” a portion of the latest privacy policy read as of June. “We may collect biometric identifiers and biometric information as defined under US laws, such as faceprints and voiceprints, from your User Content. Where required by law, we will seek any required permissions from you prior to any such collection.”

According to reports, few states have privacy laws against obtaining biometric data, including California, Illinois, New York, Texas, and Washington.

During his discussion, the former “That ’70s Show” actor added that most people believe that there is “media manipulation happening” and “misinformation campaigns” taking place, “just not through their sources.”

“I think that’s wrong, and I think we’re about to face a reckoning in that particular domain, and it’s going to probably change what social media looks like in the future,” he added. “My sense is that what social media is today is not what social media is going to be in five years. If the trendline continues on the path that it’s on today, my kids will not be on social media. If the trendline pivots as I think it likely will, there’s a change that I will allow them to use it.”